Costa Rica & Coffee Continued...


As the first plants grew, the Costa Rican interest in cultivation increased. Already in 1821 there were 17 thousand coffee trees in production, with the first export of 2 quintals of coffee to Panama in 1820. By 1840, Don Braulio Carrillo decreed that the lands to the west of San Jose, in Pavas, would be devoted to Coffee plantations. The Head of State thought that the Government should lead the coffee policy and be in charge of looking for markets and that the most important was England. Therefore ordered to build the road to the Atlantic that would allow Costa Rica to have a direct route to the British ports.

Some decades passed between the introduction of coffee and its consolidation as an export product. In that time the Costa Rican authorities took a series of measures to promote this industry. The export of the coffee was developed from 1832 when Mr. George Stiepel, who traded with England, made its first sale through Chile. The coffee trade with Europe was consolidated in the 1840s, after Englishman William Lacheur arrived on the The Monarc at Caldera and visited San Jose to negotiate the purchase from Don Santiago Fernandez Hidalgo, one of the main coffee producers of the time.

 

To be continued...